A volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean has merged with its neighbour to form one landmass, the US space agency says.
The merged island lies some 1,000km (621mi) south of Tokyo, the result of eruptions on the seafloor that have spewed enough material to rise above the water line.
In November 2013, a new island sprouted near to Nishino-shima, another volcanic landmass that last expanded in the 70s.
Four months later, the new and old islands are one island.
The newer portion of the island - which was referred to as Niijima - is now larger than the original Nishino-shima landmass.
The merged island is slightly more than 1km (3,280ft) across.
According to Nasa, two cones have formed around the main volcanic vents and stand more than 60m above sea level.
Volcanic lava flows are reported to be most active now on the south end of the island.
The new landmass lies in the Ogasawara (Bonin) Island chain.
A volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean has merged with its neighbour to form one landmass, the US space agency says.
The merged island lies some 1,000km (621mi) south of Tokyo, the result of eruptions on the seafloor that have spewed enough material to rise above the water line.
In November 2013, a new island sprouted near to Nishino-shima, another volcanic landmass that last expanded in the 70s.
Four months later, the new and old islands are one island.
The newer portion of the island - which was referred to as Niijima - is now larger than the original Nishino-shima landmass.
The merged island is slightly more than 1km (3,280ft) across.
According to Nasa, two cones have formed around the main volcanic vents and stand more than 60m above sea level.
Volcanic lava flows are reported to be most active now on the south end of the island.
The new landmass lies in the Ogasawara (Bonin) Island chain.

A volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean has merged with its neighbour to form one landmass, the US space agency says.

The merged island lies some 1,000km (621mi) south of Tokyo, the result of eruptions on the seafloor that have spewed enough material to rise above the water line.

In November 2013, a new island sprouted near to Nishino-shima, another volcanic landmass that last expanded in the 70s.

Four months later, the new and old islands are one island.

The newer portion of the island - which was referred to as Niijima - is now larger than the original Nishino-shima landmass.

The merged island is slightly more than 1km (3,280ft) across.

According to Nasa, two cones have formed around the main volcanic vents and stand more than 60m above sea level.

Volcanic lava flows are reported to be most active now on the south end of the island.

The new landmass lies in the Ogasawara (Bonin) Island chain.

Am I a grown man? Am I not a great design? Do I feel love like all of the others, or is this feeling only mine?

Matthew Dear
A vision of vertical railway stations which stretch for hundreds of metres into the sky has been put forward as a possible solution to relieving congestion in cities around the world by the end of 21st century.
The Hyper Speed Vertical Train Hub is a concept that has been entered into eVolo magazine’s annual skyscraper competition by Christopher Christophi and Lucas Mazarrasa as an alternative to the traditional rail terminal.
By flipping the station onto a vertical axis, the design reduces the impact on land use to meet the predicted rapid growth in city populations over the coming decades.
Trains stick to outside of the building using a maglev system and exit the terminal through a series of tunnels at the foot of the structure.
The constant movement of trains would create a ‘dynamic and kinetic facade’ and ferris-wheel-style seating would ensure passengers remained upright throughout their journey .
A vision of vertical railway stations which stretch for hundreds of metres into the sky has been put forward as a possible solution to relieving congestion in cities around the world by the end of 21st century.
The Hyper Speed Vertical Train Hub is a concept that has been entered into eVolo magazine’s annual skyscraper competition by Christopher Christophi and Lucas Mazarrasa as an alternative to the traditional rail terminal.
By flipping the station onto a vertical axis, the design reduces the impact on land use to meet the predicted rapid growth in city populations over the coming decades.
Trains stick to outside of the building using a maglev system and exit the terminal through a series of tunnels at the foot of the structure.
The constant movement of trains would create a ‘dynamic and kinetic facade’ and ferris-wheel-style seating would ensure passengers remained upright throughout their journey .

A vision of vertical railway stations which stretch for hundreds of metres into the sky has been put forward as a possible solution to relieving congestion in cities around the world by the end of 21st century.

The Hyper Speed Vertical Train Hub is a concept that has been entered into eVolo magazine’s annual skyscraper competition by Christopher Christophi and Lucas Mazarrasa as an alternative to the traditional rail terminal.

By flipping the station onto a vertical axis, the design reduces the impact on land use to meet the predicted rapid growth in city populations over the coming decades.

Trains stick to outside of the building using a maglev system and exit the terminal through a series of tunnels at the foot of the structure.

The constant movement of trains would create a ‘dynamic and kinetic facade’ and ferris-wheel-style seating would ensure passengers remained upright throughout their journey .

And though the way is dark and hands will grab at us, I’ll remember this and only this.

Wild Beasts
The Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship. Built on the Clyde in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion.
The opening of the Suez Canal (also in 1869) meant that steam ships now enjoyed a much shorter route to China, so Cutty Sark spent only a few years on the tea trade before turning to the trade in wool from Australia, where she held the record time to Britain for ten years. Improvements in steam technology meant that gradually steamships also came to dominate the longer sailing route to Australia and the ship was sold to the Portuguese company Ferreira and Co. in 1895, and renamed Ferreira. She continued as a cargo ship until purchased by retired sea captain Wilfred Dowman in 1922, who used her as a training ship operating from Falmouth, Cornwall. After his death, Cutty Sark was transferred to the Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe in 1938 where she became an auxiliary cadet training ship alongside HMS Worcester. By 1954 she had ceased to be useful as a cadet ship and was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London on public display.
Cutty Sark is one of three historical sea vessels in London on the Core Collection of the National Historic Ships Register (the nautical equivalent of a Grade 1 Listed Building) – alongside HMS Belfast and SS Robin. She is one of only three remaining original composite construction (wooden hull on an iron frame) clipper ships from the nineteenth century in part or whole, the others being the City of Adelaide, awaiting transportation to Australia for preservation, and the beached skeleton of Ambassador of 1869 near Punta Arenas, Chile.

The ship was badly damaged by fire on 21 May 2007 while undergoing conservation. The vessel has since been restored and reopened to the public on 25 April 2012.
The Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship. Built on the Clyde in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion.
The opening of the Suez Canal (also in 1869) meant that steam ships now enjoyed a much shorter route to China, so Cutty Sark spent only a few years on the tea trade before turning to the trade in wool from Australia, where she held the record time to Britain for ten years. Improvements in steam technology meant that gradually steamships also came to dominate the longer sailing route to Australia and the ship was sold to the Portuguese company Ferreira and Co. in 1895, and renamed Ferreira. She continued as a cargo ship until purchased by retired sea captain Wilfred Dowman in 1922, who used her as a training ship operating from Falmouth, Cornwall. After his death, Cutty Sark was transferred to the Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe in 1938 where she became an auxiliary cadet training ship alongside HMS Worcester. By 1954 she had ceased to be useful as a cadet ship and was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London on public display.
Cutty Sark is one of three historical sea vessels in London on the Core Collection of the National Historic Ships Register (the nautical equivalent of a Grade 1 Listed Building) – alongside HMS Belfast and SS Robin. She is one of only three remaining original composite construction (wooden hull on an iron frame) clipper ships from the nineteenth century in part or whole, the others being the City of Adelaide, awaiting transportation to Australia for preservation, and the beached skeleton of Ambassador of 1869 near Punta Arenas, Chile.

The ship was badly damaged by fire on 21 May 2007 while undergoing conservation. The vessel has since been restored and reopened to the public on 25 April 2012.

The Cutty Sark is a British clipper ship. Built on the Clyde in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion.

The opening of the Suez Canal (also in 1869) meant that steam ships now enjoyed a much shorter route to China, so Cutty Sark spent only a few years on the tea trade before turning to the trade in wool from Australia, where she held the record time to Britain for ten years. Improvements in steam technology meant that gradually steamships also came to dominate the longer sailing route to Australia and the ship was sold to the Portuguese company Ferreira and Co. in 1895, and renamed Ferreira. She continued as a cargo ship until purchased by retired sea captain Wilfred Dowman in 1922, who used her as a training ship operating from Falmouth, Cornwall. After his death, Cutty Sark was transferred to the Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe in 1938 where she became an auxiliary cadet training ship alongside HMS Worcester. By 1954 she had ceased to be useful as a cadet ship and was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London on public display.

Cutty Sark is one of three historical sea vessels in London on the Core Collection of the National Historic Ships Register (the nautical equivalent of a Grade 1 Listed Building) – alongside HMS Belfast and SS Robin. She is one of only three remaining original composite construction (wooden hull on an iron frame) clipper ships from the nineteenth century in part or whole, the others being the City of Adelaide, awaiting transportation to Australia for preservation, and the beached skeleton of Ambassador of 1869 near Punta Arenas, Chile.

The ship was badly damaged by fire on 21 May 2007 while undergoing conservation. The vessel has since been restored and reopened to the public on 25 April 2012.

My mind has changed my body’s frame but God, I like it.

Anna Calvi

You taught me a lesson: people are stupid in the dark, people are stupid in the moonlight.

High Trestle Trail is a rail trail running 25 miles (40 km) from Ankeny, Iowa, to Woodward, Iowa. The recreation trail opened on April 30, 2011. It is a paved recreational trail that runs through the counties of Polk, Story, Boone, and Dallas in Iowa. The trail’s name is derived from a bridge that spans a series of high trestles crossing the Des Moines River between the towns of Madrid and Woodward.
Conservation board directors at the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation estimate that more than 3,000 people use this trail each week. The trail is a major component of a planned pair of 100-mile (160 km) loops that will meet near Des Moines.
The High Trestle Trail follows the route of a former Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) freight line between Woodward and Ankeny, Iowa. UPRR first proposed retiring the line in 2003. The Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation (INHF), which had organized other rail-trail projects in Iowa, bought the 439-acre corridor from UPRR in 2005. As part of the transaction, UPRR donated over $3 million of land value. INHF then transferred sections of the land to partner agencies in the five cities and four counties within the corridor.
Construction on the trail, designed by engineering firm Snyder and Associates, began in early 2005 and was overseen by Polk County Engineering. Stretches ending at the termini in Woodward and Ankeny were the first segments constructed. Additional construction was funded by a $5.6 million Congressional appropriation in 2006. With the help of additional state and federal grants, 20 remaining miles of trail were completed and opened to the public in 2008.
The last portion to be completed was the trestle bridge from which the trail derives its name. A $1.75 million grant from Vision Iowa, a project of the Iowa Economic Development Authority, funded the construction of a new bridge deck designed by RDG Dahlquist Art Studios and structural engineering firm Shuck-Briston. The project was officially completed with the grand opening of the bridge in April 2011. Following its completion, the trail was awarded a Mid American Energy Trails and Greenways project award that October.
The 13-story (40-meter) high and nearly half-mile (770-meter) long trestle bridge provides scenic views of the Des Moines River Valley and is located near mining shafts that were worked by Italian immigrant families and others who settled nearby. The bridge decking incorporates a decorative structure that represents the view through a mine shaft, and its design includes decorative lighting that remains on until midnight.
The bridge was originally built in the 1970s to carry rail traffic on a Milwaukee Road line. With the retirement of that rail line in the early 2000s, the original bridge deck was removed, and its steel I-beams were reused for a new Union Pacific bridge in Boone, Iowa. However, the piers (or trestles) remained in place, and the original piers now support a new deck designed for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Between the removal of the original decking and the construction of its replacement, the single-file line of unconnected concrete piers was informally known as “Iowa’s Stonehenge.”
These beautiful photos were taken by homemade iowa life High Trestle Trail is a rail trail running 25 miles (40 km) from Ankeny, Iowa, to Woodward, Iowa. The recreation trail opened on April 30, 2011. It is a paved recreational trail that runs through the counties of Polk, Story, Boone, and Dallas in Iowa. The trail’s name is derived from a bridge that spans a series of high trestles crossing the Des Moines River between the towns of Madrid and Woodward.
Conservation board directors at the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation estimate that more than 3,000 people use this trail each week. The trail is a major component of a planned pair of 100-mile (160 km) loops that will meet near Des Moines.
The High Trestle Trail follows the route of a former Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) freight line between Woodward and Ankeny, Iowa. UPRR first proposed retiring the line in 2003. The Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation (INHF), which had organized other rail-trail projects in Iowa, bought the 439-acre corridor from UPRR in 2005. As part of the transaction, UPRR donated over $3 million of land value. INHF then transferred sections of the land to partner agencies in the five cities and four counties within the corridor.
Construction on the trail, designed by engineering firm Snyder and Associates, began in early 2005 and was overseen by Polk County Engineering. Stretches ending at the termini in Woodward and Ankeny were the first segments constructed. Additional construction was funded by a $5.6 million Congressional appropriation in 2006. With the help of additional state and federal grants, 20 remaining miles of trail were completed and opened to the public in 2008.
The last portion to be completed was the trestle bridge from which the trail derives its name. A $1.75 million grant from Vision Iowa, a project of the Iowa Economic Development Authority, funded the construction of a new bridge deck designed by RDG Dahlquist Art Studios and structural engineering firm Shuck-Briston. The project was officially completed with the grand opening of the bridge in April 2011. Following its completion, the trail was awarded a Mid American Energy Trails and Greenways project award that October.
The 13-story (40-meter) high and nearly half-mile (770-meter) long trestle bridge provides scenic views of the Des Moines River Valley and is located near mining shafts that were worked by Italian immigrant families and others who settled nearby. The bridge decking incorporates a decorative structure that represents the view through a mine shaft, and its design includes decorative lighting that remains on until midnight.
The bridge was originally built in the 1970s to carry rail traffic on a Milwaukee Road line. With the retirement of that rail line in the early 2000s, the original bridge deck was removed, and its steel I-beams were reused for a new Union Pacific bridge in Boone, Iowa. However, the piers (or trestles) remained in place, and the original piers now support a new deck designed for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Between the removal of the original decking and the construction of its replacement, the single-file line of unconnected concrete piers was informally known as “Iowa’s Stonehenge.”
These beautiful photos were taken by homemade iowa life High Trestle Trail is a rail trail running 25 miles (40 km) from Ankeny, Iowa, to Woodward, Iowa. The recreation trail opened on April 30, 2011. It is a paved recreational trail that runs through the counties of Polk, Story, Boone, and Dallas in Iowa. The trail’s name is derived from a bridge that spans a series of high trestles crossing the Des Moines River between the towns of Madrid and Woodward.
Conservation board directors at the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation estimate that more than 3,000 people use this trail each week. The trail is a major component of a planned pair of 100-mile (160 km) loops that will meet near Des Moines.
The High Trestle Trail follows the route of a former Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) freight line between Woodward and Ankeny, Iowa. UPRR first proposed retiring the line in 2003. The Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation (INHF), which had organized other rail-trail projects in Iowa, bought the 439-acre corridor from UPRR in 2005. As part of the transaction, UPRR donated over $3 million of land value. INHF then transferred sections of the land to partner agencies in the five cities and four counties within the corridor.
Construction on the trail, designed by engineering firm Snyder and Associates, began in early 2005 and was overseen by Polk County Engineering. Stretches ending at the termini in Woodward and Ankeny were the first segments constructed. Additional construction was funded by a $5.6 million Congressional appropriation in 2006. With the help of additional state and federal grants, 20 remaining miles of trail were completed and opened to the public in 2008.
The last portion to be completed was the trestle bridge from which the trail derives its name. A $1.75 million grant from Vision Iowa, a project of the Iowa Economic Development Authority, funded the construction of a new bridge deck designed by RDG Dahlquist Art Studios and structural engineering firm Shuck-Briston. The project was officially completed with the grand opening of the bridge in April 2011. Following its completion, the trail was awarded a Mid American Energy Trails and Greenways project award that October.
The 13-story (40-meter) high and nearly half-mile (770-meter) long trestle bridge provides scenic views of the Des Moines River Valley and is located near mining shafts that were worked by Italian immigrant families and others who settled nearby. The bridge decking incorporates a decorative structure that represents the view through a mine shaft, and its design includes decorative lighting that remains on until midnight.
The bridge was originally built in the 1970s to carry rail traffic on a Milwaukee Road line. With the retirement of that rail line in the early 2000s, the original bridge deck was removed, and its steel I-beams were reused for a new Union Pacific bridge in Boone, Iowa. However, the piers (or trestles) remained in place, and the original piers now support a new deck designed for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Between the removal of the original decking and the construction of its replacement, the single-file line of unconnected concrete piers was informally known as “Iowa’s Stonehenge.”
These beautiful photos were taken by homemade iowa life High Trestle Trail is a rail trail running 25 miles (40 km) from Ankeny, Iowa, to Woodward, Iowa. The recreation trail opened on April 30, 2011. It is a paved recreational trail that runs through the counties of Polk, Story, Boone, and Dallas in Iowa. The trail’s name is derived from a bridge that spans a series of high trestles crossing the Des Moines River between the towns of Madrid and Woodward.
Conservation board directors at the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation estimate that more than 3,000 people use this trail each week. The trail is a major component of a planned pair of 100-mile (160 km) loops that will meet near Des Moines.
The High Trestle Trail follows the route of a former Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) freight line between Woodward and Ankeny, Iowa. UPRR first proposed retiring the line in 2003. The Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation (INHF), which had organized other rail-trail projects in Iowa, bought the 439-acre corridor from UPRR in 2005. As part of the transaction, UPRR donated over $3 million of land value. INHF then transferred sections of the land to partner agencies in the five cities and four counties within the corridor.
Construction on the trail, designed by engineering firm Snyder and Associates, began in early 2005 and was overseen by Polk County Engineering. Stretches ending at the termini in Woodward and Ankeny were the first segments constructed. Additional construction was funded by a $5.6 million Congressional appropriation in 2006. With the help of additional state and federal grants, 20 remaining miles of trail were completed and opened to the public in 2008.
The last portion to be completed was the trestle bridge from which the trail derives its name. A $1.75 million grant from Vision Iowa, a project of the Iowa Economic Development Authority, funded the construction of a new bridge deck designed by RDG Dahlquist Art Studios and structural engineering firm Shuck-Briston. The project was officially completed with the grand opening of the bridge in April 2011. Following its completion, the trail was awarded a Mid American Energy Trails and Greenways project award that October.
The 13-story (40-meter) high and nearly half-mile (770-meter) long trestle bridge provides scenic views of the Des Moines River Valley and is located near mining shafts that were worked by Italian immigrant families and others who settled nearby. The bridge decking incorporates a decorative structure that represents the view through a mine shaft, and its design includes decorative lighting that remains on until midnight.
The bridge was originally built in the 1970s to carry rail traffic on a Milwaukee Road line. With the retirement of that rail line in the early 2000s, the original bridge deck was removed, and its steel I-beams were reused for a new Union Pacific bridge in Boone, Iowa. However, the piers (or trestles) remained in place, and the original piers now support a new deck designed for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Between the removal of the original decking and the construction of its replacement, the single-file line of unconnected concrete piers was informally known as “Iowa’s Stonehenge.”
These beautiful photos were taken by homemade iowa life

High Trestle Trail is a rail trail running 25 miles (40 km) from Ankeny, Iowa, to Woodward, Iowa. The recreation trail opened on April 30, 2011. It is a paved recreational trail that runs through the counties of Polk, Story, Boone, and Dallas in Iowa. The trail’s name is derived from a bridge that spans a series of high trestles crossing the Des Moines River between the towns of Madrid and Woodward.

Conservation board directors at the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation estimate that more than 3,000 people use this trail each week. The trail is a major component of a planned pair of 100-mile (160 km) loops that will meet near Des Moines.

The High Trestle Trail follows the route of a former Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) freight line between Woodward and Ankeny, Iowa. UPRR first proposed retiring the line in 2003. The Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation (INHF), which had organized other rail-trail projects in Iowa, bought the 439-acre corridor from UPRR in 2005. As part of the transaction, UPRR donated over $3 million of land value. INHF then transferred sections of the land to partner agencies in the five cities and four counties within the corridor.

Construction on the trail, designed by engineering firm Snyder and Associates, began in early 2005 and was overseen by Polk County Engineering. Stretches ending at the termini in Woodward and Ankeny were the first segments constructed. Additional construction was funded by a $5.6 million Congressional appropriation in 2006. With the help of additional state and federal grants, 20 remaining miles of trail were completed and opened to the public in 2008.

The last portion to be completed was the trestle bridge from which the trail derives its name. A $1.75 million grant from Vision Iowa, a project of the Iowa Economic Development Authority, funded the construction of a new bridge deck designed by RDG Dahlquist Art Studios and structural engineering firm Shuck-Briston. The project was officially completed with the grand opening of the bridge in April 2011. Following its completion, the trail was awarded a Mid American Energy Trails and Greenways project award that October.

The 13-story (40-meter) high and nearly half-mile (770-meter) long trestle bridge provides scenic views of the Des Moines River Valley and is located near mining shafts that were worked by Italian immigrant families and others who settled nearby. The bridge decking incorporates a decorative structure that represents the view through a mine shaft, and its design includes decorative lighting that remains on until midnight.

The bridge was originally built in the 1970s to carry rail traffic on a Milwaukee Road line. With the retirement of that rail line in the early 2000s, the original bridge deck was removed, and its steel I-beams were reused for a new Union Pacific bridge in Boone, Iowa. However, the piers (or trestles) remained in place, and the original piers now support a new deck designed for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Between the removal of the original decking and the construction of its replacement, the single-file line of unconnected concrete piers was informally known as “Iowa’s Stonehenge.”

These beautiful photos were taken by homemade iowa life

Now it’s up to me, now it’s up to me to figure out my insecurities, to mend this duality.

Nils Bech